Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

The 1919 Chicago White Sox & The 2017 Houston Astros: The Sign Stealing Mechanisms That Makes A Difference

By Matthew Kalhofer Legal claims are currently being brought against the 2017 Houston Astros, a Major League Baseball (“MLB”) team. The 2017 Astros used video surveillance to engage in an unauthorized sign-stealing scheme involving the use of the opposing team’s...

The TikTok Craze: A Video Sharing App Based on Copyright Infringement

This blog explores the popularity of the app TikTok and how its widespread use is leading to copyright infringement issues. Users that create video content with music soundtracks or movie scripts are violating United States copyright law. Most importantly, copyright owners are not gaining the recognition or royalty money that they deserve—leading to a minimally regulated video-sharing system that is continuously robbing artists.

Privacy Risks vs. Public Health: How to Vote During A Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted our global society and changed the way society functions. COVID-19 poses a serious threat to individuals’ ability to vote. With state primaries and the 2020 presidential election looming, states and lawmakers are frantically trying to solve the issue of voting access and voter security during a time of social distancing and quarantine restrictions.

Necessitating Strict Regulation Of Access To Consumer Location Data

By Matthew Kalhofer Introduction: Several U.S. wireless carriers previously contracted to sell location-sharing data to data purchasing companies. This sparked an investigation into the legality of these data companies’ access and the use of such confidential...
Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • The 1919 Chicago White Sox & The 2017 Houston Astros: The Sign Stealing Mechanisms That Makes A Difference
    By Matthew Kalhofer Legal claims are currently being brought against the 2017 Houston Astros, a Major League Baseball (“MLB”) team. The 2017 Astros used video surveillance to engage in an unauthorized sign-stealing scheme involving the use of the opposing team’s pitches. The current legal claims involve “unfair business practices, negligence, and intentional interference with contractual and…
  • The TikTok Craze: A Video Sharing App Based on Copyright Infringement
    This blog explores the popularity of the app TikTok and how its widespread use is leading to copyright infringement issues. Users that create video content with music soundtracks or movie scripts are violating United States copyright law. Most importantly, copyright owners are not gaining the recognition or royalty money that they deserve—leading to a minimally regulated video-sharing system that is continuously robbing artists.
  • Privacy Risks vs. Public Health: How to Vote During A Pandemic
    The COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted our global society and changed the way society functions. COVID-19 poses a serious threat to individuals’ ability to vote. With state primaries and the 2020 presidential election looming, states and lawmakers are frantically trying to solve the issue of voting access and voter security during a time of social distancing and quarantine restrictions.
  • Necessitating Strict Regulation Of Access To Consumer Location Data
    By Matthew Kalhofer Introduction: Several U.S. wireless carriers previously contracted to sell location-sharing data to data purchasing companies. This sparked an investigation into the legality of these data companies’ access and the use of such confidential information. The companies that have contracted to purchase this location-sharing data from wireless carriers are alleged to have been…
  • Monetary Fines and Monopolization: The Case for More Aggressive Anti-Trust Measures in the World of Tech
    By William Raven “Google was the original gateway to the web. I’m here today to speak about how Google betrayed the web” stated Yelp policy head Luther Lowe at a Senate hearing on digital platforms focusing on anticompetitive practices. “Google physically demoted non-Google results even if they contained information with higher quality scores” further claimed…
  • AI-Powered Contract Management Systems: AI to Solve the Struggle of Contracting
    Nearly all growing companies, including law firms, employ a small legal team working hard behind the scenes on various paperwork transactions, especially contracts. These legal teams carry great influence and play a vital business role. A recent study conducted by a software company, Apttus, revealed that 65-percent of legal professionals say that their biggest challenge at work is the time lost locating, reviewing, and analyzing paper documents. As a result, 40-percent of legal departments now use some sort of automated contract management system to deal with their paperwork transactions. Further, 29-percent of law firms are actively seeking the use of a contract management system, and it’s about time. Recent technological developments like artificial intelligence have assisted and boosted contract management systems by helping companies overcome the challenges of contracting. The rise of artificial intelligence integrated contract management systems is inevitable and legal teams must learn the technology or they will fall behind to their competition and fail client expectations.
  • Privacy Risks vs. Public Health: How to Vote During A Pandemic
    The COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted our global society and changed the way society functions. COVID-19 poses a serious threat to individuals’ ability to vote. With state primaries and the 2020 presidential election looming, states and lawmakers are frantically trying to solve the issue of voting access and voter security during a time of social distancing and quarantine restrictions.
  • Modern Luddites?: Addressing the Automation Question for American Unions
    Automation makes unions uneasy because it threatens traditional bargaining unit work. However, humanity has been anticipating automation for over one hundred years. While dangers exist with Automation, unions can adapt to technological changes and complete more meaningful labor.
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