Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

Protecting Client Information When Traveling Internationally

Border Patrol has the right to search one’s electronic devices when entering the Country. This poses a problem for attorneys who travel with confidential client information stored on their devices.

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Should We Trust the News Reported on Social Media?

Fake news has been spreading through our social media news feeds for years, but social media sites have begun to see the harsh consequences of these unregulated deceptive posts. Recent events such as the 2016 presidential election and the Las Vegas shooting have sparked interest of the spread of fake news in not only the eyes of politicians and platform creators, but also the public at large.

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From Love Letters to Explicit Photos: The Movement of Sexting

States and legislatures are struggling with the concept of sexting and how to go about punishing minors who send, distribute, and possess sexual photos. The blog touches upon a specific case that was examined by the Washington Supreme Court and the goals of other states to limit sexting.

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Elon Musk uses Puerto Rico as a “Flagship” Power Project

Following the devastation of Hurricane Maria and the other Caribbean storms of the 2017 hurricane season, Puerto Rico faces an uphill climb in their effort to rebuild. While reports estimate that 85% of the island is still without power, tech revolutionary Elon Musk proposed an eye-opening solution.

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Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • Protecting Client Information When Traveling Internationally
    Border Patrol has the right to search one’s electronic devices when entering the Country. This poses a problem for attorneys who travel with confidential client information stored on their devices.
  • Should We Trust the News Reported on Social Media?
    Fake news has been spreading through our social media news feeds for years, but social media sites have begun to see the harsh consequences of these unregulated deceptive posts. Recent events such as the 2016 presidential election and the Las Vegas shooting have sparked interest of the spread of fake news in not only the eyes of politicians and platform creators, but also the public at large.
  • From Love Letters to Explicit Photos: The Movement of Sexting
    States and legislatures are struggling with the concept of sexting and how to go about punishing minors who send, distribute, and possess sexual photos. The blog touches upon a specific case that was examined by the Washington Supreme Court and the goals of other states to limit sexting.
  • Elon Musk uses Puerto Rico as a “Flagship” Power Project
    Following the devastation of Hurricane Maria and the other Caribbean storms of the 2017 hurricane season, Puerto Rico faces an uphill climb in their effort to rebuild. While reports estimate that 85% of the island is still without power, tech revolutionary Elon Musk proposed an eye-opening solution.
  • Apple’s Appeal of Class Action Lawsuit Alleging the Company of Inflating Prices of App Store Applications
    This blog will discuss Apple’s appeal of a class-action lawsuit claiming violation of federal anti-trust law.
  • Fourth Amendment Doctrine Due For An Upgrade
    In recent decades, courts have struggled to apply Fourth Amendment protections to new technologies. With increased communication over the phone, some information held by telephone providers was subject to the “third party doctrine.” The proliferation of smartphones, however, has led to more and more data and information being held by these third parties, and the judiciary may be forced to adjust the Fourth Amendment Doctrine to account for such changes. Carpenter v. United States provides the Supreme Court with that chance.
  • President Trump Takes Action Against China for $1.2 Trillion in IP Theft
    China is accused of violating international trade agreements by engaging in unfair and deceptive trade practices. As a signatory of TRIPS, China is bound to provide and enforce IPR. A closer look at China’s industrial trade practices show it has failed to do so. President Trump has directed the U.S. Trade Representative to investigate the claims and decide whether sanctions are warranted.
  • LinkedIn Appeals “Info Scraping” Suit to Ninth Circuit
    In August, a U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of California granted a preliminary injunction brought by hiQ Labs that ordered LinkedIn to remove any technology preventing hiQ from accessing public profiles. Judge Edward Chen ruled that LinkedIn cannot prevent startups, such as hiQ, from accessing users’ public profile data. However, LinkedIn appealed this order to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in October claiming a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”).
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