Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

How “Clone” Games Are Threatening The Gaming Industry

As the gaming industry continues to expand, so do the legal issues intertwined within. One of the biggest and most concerning issues at this year’s conference was the issue of “cloners”, games that rip off original developers.

Should Amazon Be Out of the Surveillance Game?

This blog looks at the legal precautions of Amazon’s new facial recognition software. Government agencies, such as American Civil Liberties Union and Immigration and Customs Enforcement are worried about the artificial software leading to too much governmental control.

How Much Tech Knowledge Should Lawyers Have?

Over 30 states today require Lawyers to have technology competence, however, it is unclear what exactly that means.

Blockchain Voting Introduces New Pros and Cons into Voting Spheres

A new technology featured in the 2018 Midterm Elections was the phenomenon of blockchain voting. Blockchain, a cryptographic list of records, connects “blocks” containing data in a sequence that cannot be altered or modified.

Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • How “Clone” Games Are Threatening The Gaming Industry
    As the gaming industry continues to expand, so do the legal issues intertwined within. One of the biggest and most concerning issues at this year’s conference was the issue of “cloners”, games that rip off original developers.
  • Should Amazon Be Out of the Surveillance Game?
    This blog looks at the legal precautions of Amazon’s new facial recognition software. Government agencies, such as American Civil Liberties Union and Immigration and Customs Enforcement are worried about the artificial software leading to too much governmental control.
  • How Much Tech Knowledge Should Lawyers Have?
    Over 30 states today require Lawyers to have technology competence, however, it is unclear what exactly that means.
  • Blockchain Voting Introduces New Pros and Cons into Voting Spheres
    A new technology featured in the 2018 Midterm Elections was the phenomenon of blockchain voting. Blockchain, a cryptographic list of records, connects “blocks” containing data in a sequence that cannot be altered or modified.
  • Amazon HQ2 –– Principal Place(s) of Business?
    Description: On November 18, 2018, Amazon officially selected the location for, “HQ2,” its second corporate headquarters. HQ2 will be split between New York and Virginia. Soon to create a corporate headquarters in three different states, Amazon’s choice raises a novel legal question.
  • Nothing Neutral Here: The Legal Battle Between the Trump DOJ and California Over Net Neutrality
    After the Trump FCC agreed to repeal net neutrality rules, California passed net neutrality rules prohibiting internet service providers (ISPs) from creating fast lanes or intentionally slowing down websites. In response, the Department of Justice announced that it would sue California to prevent the enforcement of the CA net neutrality law, arguing that the decision violates the dormant commerce clause (which prohibits state discrimination and undue burdens on interstate commerce). This blog post will discuss the history of the dormant commerce power and the implications of the DOJ’s lawsuit, if successful.
  • Amazon, Arbitration, and Customer Vindication
    Amazon’s wildly popular Amazon Prime subscription service guarantees two-day shipping on all orders. Many argue that is instrumental to its success and record-breaking revenue generation. But what happens when consumers have complaints?
  • Built-in-Biases: Automated Hiring Processes are not yet Gender-Neutral
    Amazon was recently forced to scrap its experimental hiring tool after discovering bias against female candidates. This data analytics program was designed to sift through thousands of applications, creating a rating for potential candidates, but was found to favor male applicants. This blog illustrates certain limitations of machine-learning, while specifically exploring the example of Amazon’s experimental findings.
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