Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

Canadian Court Applies the Right to Be Forgotten Remedy to Intellectual Property Matters and In Order to Not Enforce the Ruling, Google Files a Lawsuit in U.S. in an Attempt to Get an Injunction Against the Canadian Order

Discussion on Google’s US Court ruling that a Canadian Ruling Requiring Google to Delist a website was Unenforceable And Violated Free Speech.

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Big Brother’s Listening

The widespread use of cellphones has led to the development of new law enforcement technology. StingRay technology can now pinpoint the location of a specific individual’s cellphone by mimicking a cell tower and “sweeping-up” data from all cellphones within its range. However, this means law enforcement may potentially be gathering information from thousands of private citizens’ cellphones without their knowledge or consent. Should the use of these devices require a warrant? Are they even considered a search? What are the Fourth Amendment implications of using StingRay technology?

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How the United Kingdom’s 2018 Drone Regulations Affect American Drone Users

The United Kingdom has introduced a bill which grants police enhanced control over the use of drones. The laws are comprehensive, including giving law enforcement the ability to require users to take classes. This blog will examine the new laws and compare the provisions to those which affect American drone operators, particularly in the criminal context.

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Narrowing of Section 101 Subject Matter Eligibility in ex parte Timothy

SureGene’s personalized medicine treatment was found to be unpatentable under Section 101 subject matter eligibility and the standards set in Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Labs., Inc. 566 U.S. 66 (2012).

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Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • Canadian Court Applies the Right to Be Forgotten Remedy to Intellectual Property Matters and In Order to Not Enforce the Ruling, Google Files a Lawsuit in U.S. in an Attempt to Get an Injunction Against the Canadian Order
    Discussion on Google’s US Court ruling that a Canadian Ruling Requiring Google to Delist a website was Unenforceable And Violated Free Speech.
  • Big Brother’s Listening
    The widespread use of cellphones has led to the development of new law enforcement technology. StingRay technology can now pinpoint the location of a specific individual’s cellphone by mimicking a cell tower and “sweeping-up” data from all cellphones within its range. However, this means law enforcement may potentially be gathering information from thousands of private citizens’ cellphones without their knowledge or consent. Should the use of these devices require a warrant? Are they even considered a search? What are the Fourth Amendment implications of using StingRay technology?
  • How the United Kingdom’s 2018 Drone Regulations Affect American Drone Users
    The United Kingdom has introduced a bill which grants police enhanced control over the use of drones. The laws are comprehensive, including giving law enforcement the ability to require users to take classes. This blog will examine the new laws and compare the provisions to those which affect American drone operators, particularly in the criminal context.
  • Narrowing of Section 101 Subject Matter Eligibility in ex parte Timothy
    SureGene’s personalized medicine treatment was found to be unpatentable under Section 101 subject matter eligibility and the standards set in Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Labs., Inc. 566 U.S. 66 (2012).
  • A Reckoning For The Patent Death Squad
    On November 27, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Oil States Energy Services v. Greene’s Energy Group. In addition to the issues regarding the separation of powers, the court may decide whether patents are private property rights or public rights. The results will certainly have a large impact on patents going forward.
  • The Unregulated World of Cryptocurrency Investing: Legal Rights and Remedies
    Cryptocurrencies have emerged as an unregulated, highly-volatile yet increasingly profitable investment. The legal rights and remedies for investors remain to be determined, even as hundreds of billions of U.S. Dollars are used to purchase cryptocurrencies on a daily basis.
  • Gambling, thy name is Loot Boxes: Regulators Take Aim at a New Trend in Video Games
    In November, 2017, Hawaii State House of Representatives Member Chris Lee issued a statement regarding the questionable practices of video game developers in including “loot boxes” in many popular video games. Viewing the practices as deceptive, addicting, and attractive to children. Simultaneously, the European Union is presently weighing the legality of these in-game purchases in an effort to potentially regulate them. While loot boxes are just a regular part of a game for some nowadays, others are clamoring to have them banned outright from video games, going forward.
  • Suing Spotify: What a Settlement Could Mean For Artists and How It Could Influence Spotify’s IPO
    Spotify cannot seem to keep getting sued for failing to pay royalties to artists. Recently, Spotify settled a consolidated lawsuit for over $43 million to be paid out to artists. Though the settlement is awaiting approval from the court, artists are urging it not to be approved on the grounds that the amount settled when divided up is so minimal for any one artist to gain from the terms of the settlement.
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