Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

Illegal Streaming of HBO and What to Do Next

The blog will discuss the ongoing issue with illegal streaming of HBO subscription based services.

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Where Have You Been for the Past 127 Days? SCOTUS to Decide on Warrantless Search of Cell Phone Locations in Carpenter v. United States

In October, the Supreme Court will decide whether the warrantless search of historical cellphone records revealing the location and movements of a cell phone user over the course of 127 days is permitted by the Fourth Amendment. After Riley v. California in 2014, the Fourth Amendment requires a warrant to search the contents of a cell phone. Carpenter v. United States will take this analysis a step further to decide whether the FBI needed a warrant based on probable cause to obtain transactional records, such as dates, times and locations where calls were made, from Carpenter’s provider under the “third-party doctrine.”

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Unleash Tech Innovation: How Deregulation Can Spur Economic Growth

Tepid economic growth since the Great Recession can be attributed to many factors, but the Trump administration appears focused on the negative effects of federal regulations. As the current administration begins its push for deregulation, newly unleashed technological innovation will likely have positive effects on U.S. economic growth.

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Illegal Streaming of HBO and What to Do Next

The blog will discuss the ongoing issue with illegal streaming of HBO subscription based services.

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Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • Illegal Streaming of HBO and What to Do Next
    By: Peter Cruice In July 2017, HBO’s Game of Thrones TV series had launched its newest season opener, but the rise of illegal streaming produced serious back lash by HBO. According to MUSO, a piracy monitoring firm, the season opener was pirated an estimated 91.74 times around. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) protects internet…
  • Where Have You Been for the Past 127 Days? SCOTUS to Decide on Warrantless Search of Cell Phone Locations in Carpenter v. United States
    By: Jenna Connors In 2011, police arrested four men, including the petitioner, Timothy Carpenter, in connection with nine armed robberies occurring over a two-year period at RadioShack and T-Mobile stores in the Detroit area. One of the conspirators admitted his guilt and provided the police with 16 different phone numbers from stolen phones called or…
  • Unleash Tech Innovation: How Deregulation Can Spur Economic Growth
    By: Terence Durkin It was a key theme of the Trump campaign, that overwhelming federal regulations suffocate industry and stifle much needed innovation. Despite historically low levels of unemployment, national wage growth still lags behind past rates and the labor participation rate continues to sit at historic lows. Technological innovation can be a solution to…
  • Illegal Streaming of HBO and What to Do Next
    By: Peter Cruice In July 2017, HBO’s Game of Thrones TV series had launched its newest season opener, but the rise of illegal streaming produced serious back lash by HBO. According to MUSO, a piracy monitoring firm, the season opener was pirated an estimated 91.74 times around. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) protects internet…
  • Do You Revoke Your Right of Privacy When You Welcome Smart Technology Into Your Home?
    By: Jennifer Bourne This past month, smart technology has made headlines for breaching the privacy of those who own it. In July, the iRobot’s smart vacuum “Roomba” made headlines because of a CEO’s vague statements alluding to a potential sale of user data to third parties. The data collected by these wifi-connected vacuums includes square…
  • Employees Are Gaining Some Privacy Rights in the Workplace
    By: Meghan Huggan Does your employer know about those personal emails you have been sending during work hours? They probably do, and may have even read them. Privacy is not a fundamental right for US employees, but a recent decision by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has begun to change…
  • Tech Companies Rally to Defend DACA
    By: Susan Allen Regardless of one’s political affiliation, it is safe to conclude that the Trump Administration’s announcement ending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) on September 5, 2017 stunned the American people. Originally established in 2012 by the Obama Administration, DACA was an immigration policy that permitted certain individuals, who entered the United States…
  • “Hell” on Wheels
    By:  Alexa D’Angelo In September 2017, the FBI began their investigation into Uber’s competitive intelligence software program called “Hell." The FBI’s New York office and the Manhattan U.S. Attorney’s office initiated their probe into whether this software allowed Uber to illegally access and obtain unauthorized data of their competitor Lyft. A key issue they will…
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