Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

Are We In For a “Cloudy” Day When It Comes To Data Privacy?

The CLOUD Act was just approved in both the House and Senate. Using the CLOUD Act, U.S. law enforcement officials at any level, from local police to federal agents, can force tech companies to turn over user data regardless of where the company stores the data. Specifically, it involves data stored in foreign jurisdictions. The U.S. can enter into bilateral information sharing agreements with foreign countries that would give both parties access to data stored within their borders. Some believe this act would have adverse effects to pending litigation as well as the future of our privacy.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Awkward Conversation

In an effort to reduce confusion during intimate encounters, app developers are introducing affirmative consent applications. Recent movements such as #timesup and #metoo are propelling affirmative consent to the forefront.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

DNA a La Carte: Legal Issues on the Horizon Around Commercialized DNA Testing

Do you own your genetic information? With the increasing popularity of affordable DNA analysis services, questions arise as to just where your personal information is going, who can use it, and whether it can be sold.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Modern Day 911 Calls: The Legal Implications of Using Uber in Place of an Ambulance

The ever-popular ride sharing apps such as Uber and Lyft are beginning to be used for a new purpose: trips to the emergency room. Instead of calling 911, individuals in need of emergency care are hailing Uber or Lyft to rush them to the hospital, rather than ambulances. However, experts believe this use of technology puts drivers and the ride sharing companies at risk for assuming unbeknownst legal liabilities.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • Are We In For a “Cloudy” Day When It Comes To Data Privacy?
    The CLOUD Act was just approved in both the House and Senate. Using the CLOUD Act, U.S. law enforcement officials at any level, from local police to federal agents, can force tech companies to turn over user data regardless of where the company stores the data. Specifically, it involves data stored in foreign jurisdictions. The U.S. can enter into bilateral information sharing agreements with foreign countries that would give both parties access to data stored within their borders. Some believe this act would have adverse effects to pending litigation as well as the future of our privacy.
  • The Awkward Conversation
    In an effort to reduce confusion during intimate encounters, app developers are introducing affirmative consent applications. Recent movements such as #timesup and #metoo are propelling affirmative consent to the forefront.
  • DNA a La Carte: Legal Issues on the Horizon Around Commercialized DNA Testing
    Do you own your genetic information? With the increasing popularity of affordable DNA analysis services, questions arise as to just where your personal information is going, who can use it, and whether it can be sold.
  • Modern Day 911 Calls: The Legal Implications of Using Uber in Place of an Ambulance
    The ever-popular ride sharing apps such as Uber and Lyft are beginning to be used for a new purpose: trips to the emergency room. Instead of calling 911, individuals in need of emergency care are hailing Uber or Lyft to rush them to the hospital, rather than ambulances. However, experts believe this use of technology puts drivers and the ride sharing companies at risk for assuming unbeknownst legal liabilities.
  • Should CFIUS Investigate Broadcom’s Hostile Takeover of Qualcomm?
    Broadcom attempted a hostile takeover of Qualcomm. On a March 6th shareholder vote, Broadcom will attempt to implement 6 board members on Qualcomm’s board of directors, which would then allow Broadcom to have a majority vote to allow their acquisition of Qualcomm to move forward. Should CFIUS investigate initiate an investigation of this hostile takeover?
  • Crime Predicting Software Falls Short
    A recent study published in Science Advances suggests that humans can predict future crimes just as well as crime predicting software. Compas, Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions, used in courtrooms across America is now raising concerns about its role in judicial decision-making.
  • STRIKING OUT - YOUTUBE’S SWING-AND-MISS COPYRIGHT ID SYSTEM
    Faced with the dilemma of keeping their website free from unlawful activity, YouTube’s Content ID system works to keep copyright infringement at bay. Unfortunately, the automated system leaves small content creators voiceless at the whim of copyright claims from corporate entities. Is there a realistic solution for Youtube?
  • Inexperienced Investors and Unregulated Markets: The Truth Behind Bitcoin Market Scams
    As more and more people find themselves falling for the hype of Bitcoin, Internet chatroom users are taking advantage of inexperienced investors by spreading false news in order to make quick money through a pump-and-dump scheme. Scammers are able to engage in conduct that would typically be considered illegal, but can get away with the fraud because there are no active regulations regarding virtual currency.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Skip to toolbar