Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

Instant Paycheck, Just Add Water: Are Early Wage Access Services Just Payday Loans Reinvented?

There are numerous phone applications and online services that provide consumers with real-time or same-day paychecks. While this concept is great in theory and has real, articulable benefits, there are many concerns surrounding the lack of regulation behind them.

Standing Up to Big Brother: Proposed Massachusetts Bill Will Limit Facial Recognition by State and Local Law Enforcement

Sen. Cynthia Creem, D-Newton has proposed a bill in the Massachusetts Legislature that will limit the ability of state and local law enforcement to use facial recognition technology and other biometric systems. Law enforcement leaders are concerned this will inhibit police’s ability to use the technology to effectively do their jobs.

Dance Battle: Creators of Fortnite Facing Yet Another Lawsuit for Misappropriating Popular Dance Moves

Two former University of Maryland basketball players who started the viral the “Running Man” challenge in 2016 have filed the fourth lawsuit against video game developer Epic Games for its unauthorized use of dance moves in Fortnite. The claims against the company include copyright infringement and violation of the right of publicity. Epic Games has already asked a California judge to dismiss the first case filed in 2018, asserting that its use of the dance moves was protected by the First Amendment. While the company has a strong defense against the copyright infringement claims, it faces more of a challenge in arguing that it did not violate plaintiffs’ right of publicity.

Beep…Beep…Beep…Is That Coming From Your Wrist?

By Taylor Ferrara Imagine, for a moment, a daytime drama or any medical television show or movie.  What you do imagine?  Usually, you’ll imagine the blinding white doctor coats, nurses’ in green scrubs, stethoscopes hanging from doctors’ necks, people hooked up to IVs...
Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • Instant Paycheck, Just Add Water: Are Early Wage Access Services Just Payday Loans Reinvented?
    There are numerous phone applications and online services that provide consumers with real-time or same-day paychecks. While this concept is great in theory and has real, articulable benefits, there are many concerns surrounding the lack of regulation behind them.
  • Standing Up to Big Brother: Proposed Massachusetts Bill Will Limit Facial Recognition by State and Local Law Enforcement
    Sen. Cynthia Creem, D-Newton has proposed a bill in the Massachusetts Legislature that will limit the ability of state and local law enforcement to use facial recognition technology and other biometric systems. Law enforcement leaders are concerned this will inhibit police’s ability to use the technology to effectively do their jobs.
  • Dance Battle: Creators of Fortnite Facing Yet Another Lawsuit for Misappropriating Popular Dance Moves
    Two former University of Maryland basketball players who started the viral the “Running Man” challenge in 2016 have filed the fourth lawsuit against video game developer Epic Games for its unauthorized use of dance moves in Fortnite. The claims against the company include copyright infringement and violation of the right of publicity. Epic Games has already asked a California judge to dismiss the first case filed in 2018, asserting that its use of the dance moves was protected by the First Amendment. While the company has a strong defense against the copyright infringement claims, it faces more of a challenge in arguing that it did not violate plaintiffs’ right of publicity.
  • Beep…Beep…Beep…Is That Coming From Your Wrist?
    By Taylor Ferrara Imagine, for a moment, a daytime drama or any medical television show or movie.  What you do imagine?  Usually, you’ll imagine the blinding white doctor coats, nurses’ in green scrubs, stethoscopes hanging from doctors’ necks, people hooked up to IVs or a person crammed into either an MRI or X-ray machine being told…
  • A Losing Game: The Law Is Struggling To Keep Up With Technology
    By Julia Griffith The law and technology are always going head-to-head. Technology seems to be advancing at a rate that the law simply cannot keep up with. It has been estimated that the law is at least five years behind developing a technology. This estimation probably does, and should, leave most people feeling uneasy. Though new…
  • How long is too long?: Mobile Phone Warrants and The Fourth Amendment
    As the judiciary’s application of the Fourth Amendment continues to evolve in the internet era, courts have encountered cases wherein police officers seize a suspect’s cell phone, then wait an extended period before applying for a search warrant. In this particular case, the 4th Circuit overturned the conviction of a child pornographer and sex trafficker on the grounds that 31 days was too long for police officers to wait before applying for a search warrant absent unique circumstances.
  • Time To Admit That Privacy Violations By Technology Companies Are Not Just Innocent Mistakes.
    A look at the Senate Commerce Committee’s call for a hearing with Google executives to answer for recent consumer privacy violations. Members of the Committee are demanding a hearing after it was recently revealed that an in-home Google product contained a microphone, which was undisclosed to consumers.
  • Tech Toys: How the Law has Started to Regulate Drone Usage
    As drones have come in to popular usage, the federal government is forced to put at least some regulations in place for purposes of searches by police and the safety of citizens. While the Supreme Court has already ruled that most aerial searches are constitutional and do not require warrants, does that change with drones? Drones have the capability to get much lower to the ground than a plane or helicopter leaving citizens vulnerable to searches in constitutionally protected areas of their home. As technology advances, it is imperative that the courts draw a line when it comes to the capabilities of a drone to invade a citizen’s privacy.
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