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Welcome to JHTL

at Suffolk Law

JHTL is student-run by an Editorial Board of past JHTL staff members. Students who become JHTL staff members are able to receive academic credit for working on a piece for publication, cite-checking, and writing a book review. The Editorial Board coordinates and supervises the research and writing development for all JHTL staff members. Staff members are selected through the summer write-on competition, and membership is open to all students who qualify, not just those concentrating in Intellectual Property.

A unique feature of JHTL as a Suffolk Law Honor Board is its ability to publish all articles online, which allows members to publish their materials while still at Suffolk. Making articles available on Westlaw, Lexis, and the JHTL Web site allows members of the legal community direct access to our timely articles, notes, and case comments.

For more information about the JHTL, please contact us at jhtl@jhtl.org.

If you are interested in submitting an Article for publication, please review our policy on Article Submissions.

Welcome to JHTL

ESPORTS: The Billion-Dollar Industry Living in the Wild West

This blog revolves around issues that current esports athletes face as the industry struggles with the growing pains of becoming a global conglomerate. More specifically, this will dive into the drama that enveloped one of North America’s most popular esports entities, Team Solo Mid, this past year. An absolutely bizzare chain of events set into motion an eye-opening experience for current, future, and even former players.

What the Supreme Court’s Abolishment of the Lanham Act Means for the Future of Trademarks and the Washington Redskins

This blog discusses the Supreme Court’s recent decision abolishing the Lanham Act which was the only guideline that constituents had to follow in registering a trademark. Is it necessary that Congress proposes a new set of guidelines or has the public norm shifted on what constitutes a socially acceptable trademark? Increased access to social media has helped shed light on offensive, immoral, and racist trademarks that do not make sense in contemporary society.

You Are Not Alone; I Am Here with You…. Socially Distant Of Course.

Corona Virus Disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) is pushing the expansion of the use of technology into unimaginable aspects of our lives. The crisis is forever changing the healthcare industry, particularly mental health. The ongoing battle with COVID-19 is causing mental health education and treatment organizations to adapt to a new normal. Online services are the new appointment meeting as patients demand access to mental health services outside the clinic or a private office. Online therapy, also known as teletherapy, is the new normal, but is it worth the costs? A significant number of clinicians and therapists are unprepared for properly conducting treatments online compounded with the multiple issues arising from the inherent use of technology to deliver online services.

Twitter as a Weapon of Police Brutality

The following blog touches on examples of police mobilizing Twitter as a method of police brutality against Black men. Specifically, the blog relies on Hughes v. City of Dallas to highlight an instance in which improper characterization of a Black man as a protest-shooter resulted in countless death threats and unlawful arrest.

Book review

2015 – 2016

Anticipating Child Exploitation due to Blurred Boundary Lines by Media and Society

Written by Holly A. Smith and reviewed by Angelica Diaz

e-Discovery: The Untold Story of my Quest for Justice

Written by Laura A. Zubulake and reviewed by Caroline Murphy

Podcasts

In conjunction with Suffolk Law’s Intellectual Property Concentration, and under the guidance of Professor Andrew Beckerman-Rodau, JHTL produces a series of podcasts on topical issues of law, technology, and IP:

Introduction Podcast

Welcome to the JHTL Podcast 2015-2016 series! In this episode we introduce the creators and interviewers Jerry Chapin, Andrew Glenny, and Olivia Vaché, all students at Suffolk University Law School interested and/or studying technology in law.

JHTL Blog
  • ESPORTS: The Billion-Dollar Industry Living in the Wild West
    This blog revolves around issues that current esports athletes face as the industry struggles with the growing pains of becoming a global conglomerate. More specifically, this will dive into the drama that enveloped one of North America's most popular esports entities, Team Solo Mid, this past year. An absolutely bizzare chain of events set into motion an eye-opening experience for current, future, and even former players.
  • What the Supreme Court’s Abolishment of the Lanham Act Means for the Future of Trademarks and the Washington Redskins
    This blog discusses the Supreme Court’s recent decision abolishing the Lanham Act which was the only guideline that constituents had to follow in registering a trademark. Is it necessary that Congress proposes a new set of guidelines or has the public norm shifted on what constitutes a socially acceptable trademark? Increased access to social media has helped shed light on offensive, immoral, and racist trademarks that do not make sense in contemporary society.
  • You Are Not Alone; I Am Here with You…. Socially Distant Of Course.
    Corona Virus Disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) is pushing the expansion of the use of technology into unimaginable aspects of our lives. The crisis is forever changing the healthcare industry, particularly mental health. The ongoing battle with COVID-19 is causing mental health education and treatment organizations to adapt to a new normal. Online services are the new appointment meeting as patients demand access to mental health services outside the clinic or a private office. Online therapy, also known as teletherapy, is the new normal, but is it worth the costs? A significant number of clinicians and therapists are unprepared for properly conducting treatments online compounded with the multiple issues arising from the inherent use of technology to deliver online services.
  • Twitter as a Weapon of Police Brutality
    The following blog touches on examples of police mobilizing Twitter as a method of police brutality against Black men. Specifically, the blog relies on Hughes v. City of Dallas to highlight an instance in which improper characterization of a Black man as a protest-shooter resulted in countless death threats and unlawful arrest.
  • Defying Authority: The Repercussions of Epic Games Overlooking App Store Policies.
    An attempt by Epic Games (“Epic”) to circumvent a 30% revenue cut to both Apple and Google has backfired. Epic’s popular game Fortnite has been removed from Apple’s App Store (“App Store”) and Google’s Google Play Store (“Play Store”). The removal from both stores will leave millions of mobile players without the ability to play or update Fortnite.
  • 2020 Massachusetts State Election Ballot Question #1: Debate Over Access to Automobile Telematics Systems Places Voters in the Driver’s Seat
    This article considers both sides of the debate surrounding Massachusetts Ballot Question #1, looking at the arguments being made by the opposing Right to Repair and Secure Data Coalitions. In addition, context is given to this debate through looking at the debate’s history and the possible implications of a successful Yes vote and a successful No vote.
  • COVID-19 Highlights Ride-Share Employment Issues: Massachusetts Takes Action
    Following in California’s footsteps, Massachusetts filed suit against Uber and Lyft, seeking declaratory judgment that the companies’ drivers are employees, not independent contractors. Employees are offered important protections under Massachusetts Wage and Hour Laws, and the COVID-19 pandemic has only highlighted the need for these benefits for Massachusetts workers.
  • 3D Printing: Rectifying a Global Pandemic with the Push of a Button
    This blog is about the patent liability ramifications of 3D printing medical devices during the global pandemic.
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