Hedrick Smith at Ford Hall Forum on Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Hedrick Smith at Ford Hall Forum on Wednesday, October 9, 2019

 

The Political Science & Legal Studies Department and Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University present:

 

“Hedrick Smith reporting on Democracy Rebellions”

 

Join us as we screen Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist and filmmaker Hedrick Smith’s latest work, “Winning Back Our Democracy,” a documentary showing how grassroots citizen movements are winning victories for political reform state by state. The screening will be followed by a discussion with Smith and will be moderated by Rachael Cobb, chair and associate professor, Political Science & Legal Studies Department, Suffolk University.

 

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

6:00-8:00 pm

Modern Theatre

525 Washington Street, Boston

 

Hedrick Smith, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former The New York Times reporter and editor and Emmy award-winning producer/correspondent, has established himself over the past 50 years as one of America’s premier journalists. For the past four years, Smith has cross-crossed America, reporting on grass roots movements in more than 20 states and doing on-location filming that captures people power clashing with power brokers and the political establishment in half a dozen states, and scoring surprising victories. The documentary film, “Winning Back Our Democracy,” is an outgrowth of Smith’s most recent best-selling book, “Who Stole the American Dream?” a stunning account of how we have become two Americas and fallen into a dysfunctional political system. It has been hailed by reviewers both for its compelling stories and brilliant analysis.   Fore more information click here [PDF].

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Championing a Cause: The Voice of Today’s Athletes

Championing a Cause: The Voice of Today’s Athletes

Championing a Cause: The Voice of Today’s Athletes

 

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

6:00-7:30 pm

Sargent Hall, Fifth Floor Commons, 120 Tremont Street, Boston

 

Today’s professional athletes have increasingly leveraged their powerful voices and the platforms their mediated profession provides. From raising money to combat major diseases to calling awareness to major societal issues, athletes have the power to influence opinion and affect change. While athletes have worked hard at their craft, reached the highest levels of their profession, and tapped the capital markets, some demand that athletes “shut up and dribble.” Would the same be demanded of any other professional who has reached the highest levels of his or her industry?

 

Join Ford Hall Forum as we host a unique and intimate conversation with some of the nation’s most charitable and vocal athletes and representatives from Boston’s business and non-profit community. The evening’s guests are Devin McCourty, acclaimed free safety, New England Patriots. Off the field, McCourty is deeply engaged in social activism on numerous topics including criminal justice and education reform. McCourty is one of the most visible leaders of the Players Coalition, a nonprofit organization governed by 12 NFL players, which is committed to raising awareness about social issues and advocating for change; Michael Bornhorst, Associate Vice President, Corporate Development and Special Events, Boston Children’s Hospital Trust; Rebekah Splaine-Salwasser, Executive Director, Red Sox Foundation/Take the Lead; and April Heinrichs, a US Women’s National Soccer Team legend. Heinrichs captained the tournament-winning first US women’s World Cup team in 1991 and coached the next generation of women’s soccer players including Mia Hamm and Brandi Chastain at the World Cup and in the Olympics.

Register: click here. 

“The Art of Leaving”

“The Art of Leaving”

“The Art of Leaving”

 

Award-winning Israeli author Ayelet Tsabari will discuss her new intimate memoir, The Art of Leaving: Language, Longing, and Belonging, in this afternoon of conversation and selected readings from the book. The afternoon’s moderator is Shoshana Madmoni-Gerber, associate professor, Communication, Journalism & Media Department, Suffolk University.

 

Thursday, October 31, 2019

12:15-1:30 p.m.

Poetry Center, Mildred Sawyer Library, Second Floor

73 Tremont Street, Boston

 

Author of the award-winning The Best Place on Earth and The Art of Leaving: Language, Longing, and Belonging, Ayelet Tsabari will speak of growing up Mizrahi in Israel, about re-finding and reclaiming that identity through writing and through extensive research into Yemeni culture and traditions. Tsabari will share some of the unique challenges she has faced as an immigrant author writing about Israel in English, her second language. This lecture will explore the many ways in which a writer’s cultural background, mother tongue, and origins influence and inform her writing, in terms of both content and style.

 

Praise for The Art of Leaving

 

The Art of Leaving is a marvel of a book, at once tender and fearless, from a writer at the peak of her creative powers.” – Kamal Al-Solaylee

 

About Ayelet Tsabari

 

Ayelet Tsabari was born in Israel to a large family of Yemeni descent. She is the author of the memoir in essays The Art of Leaving. Essays from the book have won several awards including a National Magazine Award and a Western Magazine Award. Her first book, The Best Place on Earth, won the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature and the Edward Lewis Wallant Award, and was long listed to the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. The book was a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice, a Kirkus Review Best Book of 2016, and has been published internationally. Her work has appeared in The New York TimesThe Globe and MailThe Forward, and The National Post. She teaches creative writing at King’s College MFA in Creative Nonfiction and at Tel Aviv University.

 

An Evening with Etgar Keret, internationally acclaimed best-selling Israeli writer and award-winning filmmaker.

Ford Hall Forum presents:

An Evening with Etgar Keret, internationally acclaimed best-selling Israeli writer and award-winning filmmaker. The evening’s moderator is Michal Ben-Joseph Hirsch, assistant professor, Government Department, Suffolk University.

 

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

6:00- 7:30 PM

Modern Theatre

525 Washington Street

Boston, MA 02111

Internationally acclaimed for his short stories, Etgar Keret is hailed as the voice of young Israel. Keret’s books are bestsellers in Israel and have been published in over forty languages. His books include his memoir, The Seven Good Years, The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God, and Suddenly a Knock on the Door, which became an instant #1 bestseller in Israel.  Keret’s new book of stories Fly Already won the prestigious Sapir Prize, and is forthcoming in English in September 2019. Keret’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the Paris Review, among many other publications. He is a regular contributor to This American Life. In 2016, Keret was awarded The Charles Bronfman Prize, recognizing his work as inspiring Jewish Values and having global impact. As a filmmaker, Keret is the writer of several feature screenplays, including Skin Deep (1996), which won First Prize at several international film festivals and was awarded the Israeli Oscar.

Praise for Etgar Keret 

“Etgar Keret is a genius…” —The New York Times 

“A brilliant writer…completely unlike any writer I know. The voice of the next generation.” —Salman Rushdie 

Safi Bahcall’s Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas that Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries.

Safi Bahcall’s Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas that Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries.

March 20, 2019, 6-7:30 p.m. Sargent Hall, Fifth Floor Commons, 120 Tremont Street, Boston

Author Safi Bahcall will discuss his new book, Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas that Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries.

 

What do James Bond and Lipitor have in common? Why do traffic jams appear out of nowhere on highways? What can we learn about human nature and world history from a glass of water? Physicist and biotech entrepreneur Bahcall, reveals a surprising new way of thinking about the mysteries of group behavior that challenges everything we thought we knew about radical breakthroughs. Bahcall shows why groups will suddenly change from embracing wild new ideas to rigidly rejecting them, just as flowing water will suddenly change into brittle ice. Mountains of print have been written about culture. Learn the small shifts in structure that control this transition, the same way that temperature controls the change from water to ice. The program will be moderated by Andrew McAfee, co-director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, and the associate director of the Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management, which studies the ways information technology affects businesses and society.

 

Praise for Loonshots

“This book has everything: new ideas, bold insights, entertaining history and convincing analysis. Not to be missed by anyone who wants to understand how ideas change the world.”

~ Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking, Fast and Slow and winner of the Nobel Prize

 

Photograph of author Safi Bahcall

Author Safi Bahcall

 

Frye Gaillard’s, A Hard Rain: America in the 1960s, Our Decade of Hope, Possibility, and Innocence

Frye Gaillard’s, A Hard Rain: America in the 1960s, Our Decade of Hope, Possibility, and Innocence

March 26, 2019, 6-7:30 p.m., Sargent Hall, Fifth Floor Commons, 120 Tremont Street, Boston

Author Frye Gaillard will discuss his recent book, A Hard Rain: America in the 1960s, Our Decade of Hope, Possibility, and Innocence. Frye Gaillard has given us a deeply personal history, bringing his keen storyteller’s eye to this pivotal time in American life. He explores the competing story arcs of tragedy and hope through the political and social movements of the times ― civil rights, black power, women’s liberation, the War in Vietnam, and the protests against it. But he also examines the cultural manifestations of change ― music, literature, art, religion, and science ― and so we meet not only the Brothers Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X, but also Gloria Steinem, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash, Harper Lee, Mister Rogers, James Baldwin, Andy Warhol, Billy Graham, George Wallace, Richard Nixon, Angela Davis, Barry Goldwater,and the Beatles. The evening’s moderator is Robert Poulton, Vice President, Marketing & Branding, NBC10 Boston, NECN & Telemundo Boston.

This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP Here

Praise for A Hard Rain

A Hard Rain is essential reading for a time when an American president has willfully ignored the hard-earned lessons from our passage through the most tumultuous decade of social change since the Civil War.”
~Howell Raines, former executive editor, The New York Times, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize

 

Author photo of Frye Gaillard

Frye Gaillard

 

Old North Church Speaker Series presented in partnership with Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University, presents a lecture by John Shattuck, March 27, 2019, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Old North Church

Old North Church Speaker Series presented in partnership with Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University, presents a lecture by John Shattuck, March 27, 2019, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Old North Church

Old North Church Speaker Series presented in partnership with Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University: LECTURE + COMMUNITY CONVERSATION

Populism and Nationalism: What We Can Do to Strengthen Our Democracy, a lecture by John Shattuck, foreign affairs and human rights expert.

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Old North Church,

193 Salem Street,

Boston MA 02113

Populist discontent with democracy is on the rise. We see examples of this dissatisfaction in the economic and cultural rebellions of people feeling threatened by globalization and shut out by elites. John Shattuck, foreign affairs and human rights expert, will examine how that discontent is being manipulated by opportunistic politicians in the US and Europe. These political figures claim they can fix the situation by strengthening nationalism, which often translates into weakening democratic institutions and centralizing power. How does that affect our global and domestic communities? What are the potential sources of resilience of our democracy, and what can we do as citizens to save it?

 

Afterwards, join us for a reception and Community Conversation, co-facilitated by Shattuck and Brian Conley, Ph.D., for an intimate discussion on the necessity of active citizenship and the role individuals play in governmental shifts.

John Shattuck is Professor of Practice in Diplomacy at the Fletcher School of Tufts University, specializing in transatlantic affairs and US foreign policy, and Senior Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, focusing on the contemporary crisis of democracy in the US and Europe. Previously, he served as the President of Central European University in Budapest, Hungary (2009-2016), the CEO of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation, and the US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor under President Clinton. From 1984 to 1993 Shattuck was a Vice-President at Harvard University and taught at the Harvard Law School. His many publications include Freedom on Fire, a study of the international response to genocide and crimes against humanity, Rights of Privacy, and articles on higher education, human rights, foreign affairs, and international security.

 

Brian M. Conley, PhD, is the Director of Graduate Studies and an Associate Professor in the Government Department at Suffolk University in Boston. His principal research and teaching interests are in the areas of political parties, the US electoral politics, political marketing and communication. His research and writing have appeared in the Studies in American Political Development, American Review of Politics, the Journal of American Studies and Political Science Quarterly as well as in numerous political anthologies on US politics. In 2014, he edited, with Kenneth Cosgrove and Jennifer Lees-Marshment, Political Marketing in the United States for Routledge. Current research projects include a book with Routledge examining the rise of the conservative Right within the Republican Party between Goldwater and Trump. Conley’s new forthcoming book, The Rise of the Republican Right: From Goldwater to Reagan, will be released in May 2019. Conley received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the New School for Social Research in New York City.

 

Register Here.

A Conversation with Former Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Margaret Marshall

A Conversation with Former Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Margaret Marshall

April 10, 2019, 6-7:30 p.m., Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, Boston

An Evening with Former Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Margaret Marshall, the first woman to serve in the position, one that she held from 1999 until she retired in 2010.  During her tenure, she worked to ensure equal access to justice for all, including our most vulnerable populations.

Born and educated in South Africa, Marshall actively opposed the apartheid regime, and served as the President of the National Union of South African students, a leading anti-apartheid organization.  In 1968, she came to the United States on an academic scholarship.  Unable to return home because of her political activism, she graduated from Harvard University with a master’s degree in education and Yale Law School, and worked in private practice until the 1990s.  From her early days in South Africa, Marshall has been a defender of human rights and equality for all individuals, as reflected in her judicial decisions. Margery Eagan, co-host of WGBH’s midday program Boston Public Radio, will serve as the evening’s moderator.

TICKETS

 

Ford Hall Forum First Amendment Award

Ford Hall Forum First Amendment Award

 

 
Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University invites you to an evening with Marty Baron, Executive Editor, The Washington Post, and former Editor, The Boston Globe, as we honor him with the Forum’s First Amendment Award.
Wednesday, May 1, 2019
Sargent Hall, Fifth Floor Sky Lounge and Commons
120 Tremont Street, Boston
5:00-6:00 p.m. Cocktail Reception with Baron. The Forum also will recognize Charles Tsectares for his 43-year tenure as a Ford Hall Forum Advisory Council member.
6:00-7:30 p.m. First Amendment Award Ceremony and a conversation with Baron. The evening’s moderator is Meghna Chakrabarti, award-winning host and producer of WBUR’s On Point. 
The Forum recognizes Baron for his powerful and fearless defense of the First Amendment and the free press. Baron’s relentless pursuit of the truth over his storied career, and his stalwart defense of journalists especially in these turbulent times for the Fourth Estate, have resulted in impactful and important journalism, with implications for years to come. For more information click here [PDF].
The cocktail reception is a paid event. The Forum is free and open to the public.
About Marty Baron
Martin “Marty” Baron became Executive Editor of The Washington Post in January 2013. Newsrooms under his leadership have won 14 Pulitzer Prizes, including seven at The Post. Under Baron’s leadership, the Post has won four prizes. Previously, Baron was the Editor of The Boston Globe. During his 11 ½ year tenure, The Globe won six Pulitzer prizes. The Pulitzer Prize for Public Service was awarded to the Globe in 2003 for its investigation into clergy sex abuse in the Catholic Church, coverage portrayed years later in the Academy Award-winning movie “Spotlight.” Prior to the Globe, Baron held top editing positions at The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and the Miami Herald. Under his leadership, the Miami Herald won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Coverage for its coverage of the raid to recover Elián González, the Cuban boy at the center of a fierce immigration and custody dispute.
Shoshana Zuboff, Harvard Business School professor emerita

Shoshana Zuboff, Harvard Business School professor emerita

January 23, 2019, 6:00-7:30 p.m., Sargent Hall, Fourth Floor Moot Courtroom, 120 Tremont Street, Boston. Please join Shoshana Zuboff, Harvard Business School professor emerita, upon the publication of her latest book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power and moderator Christopher Lydon, radio host of WBUR’s Open Source.

The challenge to humanity posed by corporations that predict and control our behavior with our data. The Cambridge Analytica/Facebook scandal was just a glimpse of the ways big tech companies exploit personal data without our knowledge, and how those data are used to shape our behavior. Our challenge now is to move past the shock and revulsion to ask the most important question of our time: Will we be the masters of the information age or will it master us?

The Age of Surveillance Capitalism reveals what is at stake for our digital future and how we can reclaim control by harnessing the power of indignant citizens, journalists and policymakers. Finally, we have the book that will lift the lid off of this hidden territory in a comprehensive geography, seven years in the making: its economics, operations, secrets, power, plan for society, consequences for humanity. This is the map we have been waiting for to point us forward.

“A masterpiece of rare conceptual daring, beautifully written and deeply urgent.  — Robert B. Reich

Babylon: Journeys of Refugees

Babylon: Journeys of Refugees

January 25, 2019, 8:00-10 p.m. Modern Theatre, 525 Washington Street, Boston

Babylon: Journeys of Refugees, created and performed by the acclaimed Sandglass Theater and presented by Puppet Showplace Theater and Suffolk University.

Following the performance, Ford Hall Forum will host a discussion featuring Eric Bass, Sandglass Co-Artistic Director and Babylon director; Ragini Shah, Suffolk University clinical professor of law and founder and director of Suffolk’s Immigration Clinic; Rev. Amy L. Fisher, director of the Suffolk University Interfaith Center and the University’s chaplain and contributing author of Displaced Persons: Theological Reflection On Immigration, Refugees, And Marginalization; and moderator Iani Moreno, PhD, associate professor, Suffolk University Department World Languages & Cultural Studies.

This new production looks at the relationship of refugees to their homelands, lost and new, and the conflicts that exist within the American communities where they have fled. The tour of Babylon is supported by The National Endowment for the Arts and The Jim Henson Foundation, among others.

Babylon, is an ancient city in what is now Iraq. This fallen mythic civilization becomes a metaphor for the destruction and destabilization that is leading much of the world into a refugee crisis of mythic proportions. Sandglass Theater’s new production is a response to this crisis. Working with the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program, Sandglass Theater looked at the relationship of refugees to their homelands, lost and new. Sandglass artists interviewed resettled refugees in order to gain first hand insight into their plight, trauma, and the challenges of resettlement. This is a vital conversation in all communities, whether they are directly impacted by newly resettled refugees or not.

Using puppets and moving panoramic scrolls, Sandglass tells the refugees’ stories in original four-part choral songs. The artists work with simple means, not much more than someone could carry with them as they flee. In Babylon, the blending of actual testimony with unreal figures gives audiences a startlingly new perspective into how we can respond to the enormity of this crisis.

The Sandglass Theater and Babylon residency is made possible through the collaboration of Puppet Showplace Theater and Suffolk University’s Ford Hall Forum and Theatre Department.

Register today!

Public Domain Day

January 31, 2019, 9:00-5:00 p.m., Sargent Hall, 120 Tremont Street, Boston

Public Domain Day, so-sponsored with the Suffolk University Law School.

In January 2019, for the first time since the passage of the Copyright Term Extension Act in 1998, works will enter the public domain in the United States due to the expiration of the copyright term. This event celebrates the legal and public policy rationale behind copyright limits and the public domain, as well as the creativity of those individuals whose works will soon enter the public domain. We’ll be talking about Virginia Woolf, Charlie Chaplin, Man Ray, Hemingway, the future of copyright law and much more. Speakers include Pulitzer Prize winning author Michael Cunningham and Professor Lawrence Lessig, public domain advocate and founder of Creative Commons.

The Enemy of the People? Freedom of the Press and Democracy

The Enemy of the People? Freedom of the Press and Democracy

February 6, 2019, 6:00-7:30 p.m., Modern Theatre, 525 Washington Street, Boston

“The Enemy of the People? Freedom of the Press and Democracy,” A conversation with Suffolk University English Department Chair Bryan Trabold and Marjorie Pritchard, Deputy Managing Editor, Editorial Page, The Boston Globe.

In response to President Trump’s vilification of the media, The Boston Globe recently coordinated an initiative with newspaper editorial boards from across the country to promote the vital role that a free press plays in sustaining democracy.  This forum will examine why The Boston Globe felt compelled to respond to President Trump’s attacks, the public response to this editorial initiative, and the challenges for journalists operating in this current climate.

It will also situate The Boston Globe’s resistance within broader historical and international contexts.  What is the relationship between this editorial initiative to the long struggle for freedom of expression in the United States?  How do President Trump’s efforts to discredit and undermine an independent press compare with other countries, such as the apartheid regime in South Africa, or the current governments in Turkey, Russia, and Hungary?

These are particularly timely questions to consider.  As The Boston Globe noted in its editorial that was part of this larger national conversation, “The greatness of America is dependent on the role of a free press to speak the truth to the powerful.”

Bryan Trabold is an Associate Professor of English and department chair at Suffolk University, and a Research Associate at the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre, University of Johannesburg. His recently released book from the University of Pittsburgh Press, Rhetorics of Resistance: Opposition Journalism in Apartheid South Africa, examines the tactics of resistance developed by those working for the Weekly Mail and New Nation published in South Africa in the mid-and late 1980s. Trabold has also published articles in South African Historical JournalAfrican Journalism StudiesCollege English, and College Composition and Communication.

Marjorie Pritchard is the deputy managing editor of The Boston Globe, where she oversees the Globe’s opinion page. She edits Globe staff columnists and regular contributors as well as commissioned pieces from thought leaders around the country.

“The Power of Images and Pictures” an evening with Greg Marinovich

“The Power of Images and Pictures” an evening with Greg Marinovich

Thursday, May 16, 2019

6:00-7:30 p.m.

Sargent Hall Fifth Floor Commons, 120 Tremont Street, Boston

 

War and Conflict through the Lens of the Camera

Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalists Greg Marinovich and Craig F. Walker have captured the horrors and the humanity, the tragedy and the toll of war and conflicts through their photography. In very different conflicts, each has confronted risk, including to themselves, to shed light on the realities of war and geopolitical conflict by powerfully documenting individual stories. Their work displays both the inhumanity and the humanity of conflict, and searches for meaning. Theirs are photographs that stop us in our tracks. They are images that shed light on events happening half a world away, yet they also have an effect on us. They make each story personal and real and bring those stories home in a way that only a fantastic split second image can.

Join the Ford Hall Forum for a conversation with two award-winning photojournalists as they discuss their work, and the individual and human stories they have documented in the midst of conflict.

 

Register Here

The Child Independence Is Born: James Otis and Writs of Assistance, a lecture by Professor of Rhetoric James Farrell, PhD, University of New Hampshire

The Child Independence Is Born: James Otis and Writs of Assistance, a lecture by Professor of Rhetoric James Farrell, PhD, University of New Hampshire

Old North Speaker Series: LECTURE + COMMUNITY CONVERSATION

The Child Independence Is Born: James Otis and Writs of Assistance, a lecture by Professor of Rhetoric James Farrell, PhD, University of New Hampshire

Presented in partnership with Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University Ford Hall Forum

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Old North Church

193 Salem St.

Boston, MA 02113

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/old-north-speaker-series-james-farrell-the-child-independence-is-born-tickets-58815905958.

Many years after the American Revolution, John Adams reflected on the 1761 speech by James Otis against writs of assistance. “Otis demonstrated the illegality, the unconstitutionality, the iniquity and inhumanity of that writ in so clear a manner, that every man appeared to me to go away ready to take up arms against it,” Adams wrote. “Then and there,” he said, “the child Independence was born.” This presentation will offer a reexamination of the writs of assistance speech by James Otis, testing Adams’s claim about its importance. Did the Revolution begin with the writs of assistance trial? To answer that question, we will review the purpose and function of writs of assistance within the political, legal, and economic environment of colonial Massachusetts, and discuss the constitutional dispute over writs of assistance in the 1761 trial. With a more complete understanding of Otis’s speech, what can we conclude about his influence on colonial opposition to British rule, and about his impact on American legal development in the areas of constitutional protection against unreasonable search, and with regard to the practice of judicial review of legislative action?

 

Afterwards, join us for a reception and Community Conversation with the speaker and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law Christina A. Miller (Suffolk University)for an intimate discussion about the parallels between the writs of assistance and the parameters of search and seizure law as it is developing in the modern world.

Puritans, Native Americans, and Historians:

A Conversation about New England’s Conflicted Past

Please join us Thursday, October 25th from 6-7:30pm for this free lecture at the Suffolk University Modern Theatre at 525 Washington St in Boston.

Public commemorations have become a difficult business in recent years, often provoking sharp conflict about the meaning and implications of the past. With the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ arrival in Plymouth fast approaching, the Congregational Library & Archives, Suffolk University, and the Ford Hall Forum are sponsoring an important conversation about remembering and memorializing that event, bringing together leading scholars of Puritanism and Native American history.

Presenters:
Jean O’Brien, University of Minnesota, a White Earth Ojibwe and author of Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England (2010).

Lisa Blee, Wake Forest University, author of Framing Chief Leschi: Narratives and the Politics of Historical Justice (2014)

David D. Hall, Harvard Divinity School, author of A Reforming People: Puritanism and the Transformation of Pubic Life in New England (2011)

Marty Blatt, Professor of the Practice in History and Director of Public History Program at Northeastern

This is a program of New England Beginnings, co-sponsored by the Congregational Library & Archives, Suffolk University, and the Ford Hall Forum.

HUGO SALCEDO, Acclaimed Mexican Playwright

Tuesday, October 9, 2018, 4:00-6:00 PM Modern Theatre, 525 Washington Street, Boston

Acclaimed Mexican playwright Hugo Salcedo will present a lecture titled “A Hermetically Sealed Boxcar…Now After 31 Years of Suffocation”/Un vagón de tren herméticamente cerrado… ya 31 años de asfixia.
The lecture will be followed by an introduction of the U.S.-Mexican border by Prof. Iani Moreno.
Laura Shink will then lead a staged dramatic reading of Salcedo’s play, El viaje de los cantores – “The Troubadours’ Journey” – a series of vignettes showing Mexican men attempting to cross the border into the U.S. and the women they left behind.
The reading will be followed by a discussion with the playwright.

“The Troubadours’ Journey” is based on a true infamous 1987 incident in which 18 Mexican men were horribly suffocated in a locked steel-walled boxcar while attempting to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexican border. Told in 10 scenes, most of which flash back to and flash forward from the actual event, the play is an impressionistic, nearly religious work lamenting not only the appalling loss of life, but the conditions that led up to it.

Click here for tickets
A Conversation on Mental Health with the Sports Community

A Conversation on Mental Health with the Sports Community

Monday, September 17, 2018, 5:30-7:00 p.m.,
Modern Theatre

“A Conversation on Mental Health with the Sports Community.” Congressman Joe Kennedy III and Trenni Kusnierek, NBC Sports Boston sports anchor and reporter, will co-host a forum discussion on mental health issues among professional athletes and the sports community. Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens and former NHL player Kevin Stevens will join the discussion.

Professional athletes are regarded as tough in our culture, and mental health complications are often seen as a contradiction to that narrative. Mental illness doesn’t choose who is affected, and in fact, one in five American adults experience a mental health issue in a given year, which means that professional athletes are just as susceptible as anyone else. Increasing numbers of sports stars are breaking barriers by talking about their mental health issues in the hopes that these very personal public testimonies will encourage others to reach out for help.

Our moderators and panelists will share personal stories and discuss efforts to remove the stigma of mental health in sports, how professional leagues and teams are addressing the issue, and what’s being done on the legislative level to improve access to treatment. Audience questions will be invited.

Click here for tickets
People Who Don’t Vote: Their Impact and Importance in the 2018 and 2020 Elections.

People Who Don’t Vote: Their Impact and Importance in the 2018 and 2020 Elections.

Thursday, September 27, 2018, 12:15-1:30 p.m.,
Sargent Hall, Fifth Floor Commons

Noted pollster David Paleologos, Director, Suffolk University Political Research Center, will give a talk, “People Who Don’t Vote: Their Impact and Importance in the 2018 and 2020 Elections.” His presentation will focus on the unlikely and unregistered voter poll SUPRC released in April of this year. Mr. Paleologos will be joined by Rachael Cobb, Associate Professor and Chair, Government Department, an expert in American electoral politics and election administration.

“El Viaje de los Cantores” – “The Troubadours’ Journey”

“El Viaje de los Cantores” – “The Troubadours’ Journey”

Tuesday, October 9, 2018, 4:00-6:00 p.m., Modern Theatre, 525 Washington Street, Boston

Acclaimed Mexican playwright Hugo Salcedo will lead a staged dramatic reading of his play, “El Viaje de los Cantores” – “The Troubadours’ Journey”- a series of vignettes showing Mexican men attempting to cross the border into the U.S. and the women they left behind. The reading will be followed by a discussion with the playwright.

The Troubadours’’ Journey is based on a true 1987 incident in which 18 Mexican men were horribly suffocated in a locked steel-walled boxcar while attempting illegal immigration to the U.S. Told in 10 scenes, most of which flash back to and flash forward from the actual event, the play is an impressionistic, nearly religious work lamenting not only the appalling loss of life, but the conditions that led up to it.

 

Click here for tickets

Subscribe By Email

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

This form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Skip to toolbar